Top 5 Tips for Hiring a Designer

At some point in your career you may find yourself in need of hiring a designer or being asked your opinion on samples of work during research.

Before you even start your research, you should have a very basic idea of what you are looking for and what you are trying to accomplish. You do not want to have a crystal clear “vision” in your mind because you will never find someone to fit those exact requirements and you will lose out on the possibility of an end product that exceeds those initial ideas.

There are many other elements that go along with hiring a designer, but before you even get into the nitty-gritty details, here are a few basic tips to help you get started as you are researching and looking at work examples, as well as during more in-depth discussions once you’ve whittled down the pack.

Design Aesthetic

Your organizations’ message, brand, personality and vision are unique so why not hire someone who will capture your essence instead of a firm who cranks out cookie-cutter, unimaginative designs. So during your initial research, do a simple review of designers you come across and ask these simple questions…

Do you like their previous work?
Is the design of their work pleasing to you?
Is the design eclectic or conservative?
Can you picture the message you want to convey in the work samples you’ve seen?
You should be able to quickly review samples and weed out those designers who you can see will not meet your needs.

Availability

Timing is everything for many elements that have to be designed-a promotional flyer, a website for a product or company launch, an advertisement, tradeshow booth graphics, etc.

If you need to have a brochure in your hands in two weeks, make sure your designer has the availability and bandwidth to meet those demands.

Always give a deadline, but add as much “padding” as possible, starting with your search and through the design process.

If you are not the only decision-maker, you need to leave room in your review and edits schedule to work with others in your organization who may have other priorities than reviewing, commenting and approving your document or website.

Non-designers and those who do not work with designers regularly do not always understand how long it can take just to work on editing one image, so be sure to give yourself and your chosen designer enough time to meet all deadlines so the end product will be the best it can possibly be.